Pancreatic cancer has long been one of the hardest to treat. Now, in a new study, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have illuminated one of this cancer’s major resistance mechanisms: a form of inflammation that is triggered by the tumor in response to treatment and helps keep tumor cells alive. Blocking this inflammation after radiation therapy brought a significant improvement in survival in a mouse model of the disease.

https://ask-holometa.tumblr.com/

“This is a step forward in understanding pancreatic cancer’s resistance to standard therapies,” said principal investigator Gregory Beatty, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Hematology/Oncology at Penn and a member of Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center. The study was published in the January issue of Clinical Cancer Research. That strong resistance to treatment has kept pancreatic cancer near the top of the list of the deadliest cancers. Only about eight percent of patients diagnosed with the usual type of pancreatic cancer—pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma—survive another five years. Annually, about 40,000 people in the United States, and more than 300,000 around the world die of this form of cancer. Studies in recent years by Beatty’s laboratory and others have pointed to one potential source of this treatment resistance: Pancreatic tumors tend to surround themselves with a protective “microenvironment.”

https://first1grc.blogspot.com/

“We know that if you take these tumor cells out of a patient and put them in a petri dish, they can be killed by chemotherapy,” Beatty said. “But in the body, within the microenvironment they create, they somehow manage to resist elimination even by our most cytotoxic therapies.” This tumor-protecting microenvironment includes inflammatory white blood cells called monocytes and macrophages. In pancreatic cancer, their activity boosts tumor growth and spread, and may also help suppress T cells and other immune elements that would otherwise attack the tumor. Source: https://www.pennmedicine.org/news/news-releases/2017/january/penn-researchers-help-unravel-mysteries-of-pancreatic-cancers-resistance-to-standard-therapies
No posts.
No posts.